Grants Glossary

 FAQs
The definitions below pertain to funding opportunities for the State of Illinois.

For a glossary of terminology for the federal level, visit this page.
All A C E H I N O P R S T W Y Acronyms

  • Alternative/Reemployment Trade Adjustment Assistance

    ​A wage supplement provided to eligible workers over the age of 50 that supplements a portion of the wage difference between their new wage and their old wage (up to a specified maximum amount) for full time employment.

  • Apprenticeship

    ​An employer-driven, "learn while you earn" model that combines structured on-the-job training (OJT) with job-related instruction in curricula tied to the attainment of industry-recognized skills standards and leading to an industry credential. The OJT is provided by the employer, who hires the apprentice at the commencement of the program and pays the participant during the program.

  • Apprenticeship Intermediary

    ​An organization that can help broker local, regional, and national workforce solutions by, among other things, helping job seekers find jobs and employers find workers; convening employers and community partners to determine workforce trends; and assisting in blending customized services and seed funding to grow the demand for new apprenticeship programs. Examples of apprenticeship intermediaries include industry associations, Institutions of Higher Education, CBOs, chambers of commerce, local workforce areas, and community service organizations. Industry Intermediaries usually specialize in a specific sector, but some may possess expertise that cuts across more than one market. The Intermediary will serve as the Sponsor of the apprenticeship program, if they provide appropriate evidence of partnering with employers.

  • ATAA/RTAA

    ​A wage supplement provided to eligible workers over the age of 50 that supplements a portion of the wage difference between their new wage and their old wage (up to a specified maximum amount) for full time employment.

  • Career Pathway

    ​Defined in WIOA as a combination of rigorous and high‐quality education, training, and other services that:

    • Aligns with the skill needs of industries in the economy of the State or regional economy involved;  
    • Prepares an individual to be successful in any of a full range of secondary or postsecondary education options, including apprenticeships registered under the Act of August 16, 1937 (commonly known as the ''National Apprenticeship Act''; 50 Stat. 664, chapter 663; 29 USC 50 et seq.) (referred to individually in this Act as an ''apprenticeship'', except in section 171);  
    • Includes counseling to support an individual in achieving their education and career goals;  
    • Includes, as appropriate, education offered concurrently with and in the same context as workforce preparation activities and training for a specific occupation or occupational cluster;  
    • Organizes education, training and other services to meet the particular needs of an individual in a manner that accelerates the educational and career advancement of the individual to the extent practicable;  
    • Enables an individual to attain a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent, and at least one recognized postsecondary credential; and  
    • Helps an individual enter or advance within a specific occupation or occupational cluster (see Appendix A for more information on Illinois' Common Career Pathways Definition & Guidance).
  • Case Management Services

    ​The workers will receive many Case Management services during their participation in the Trade program, however there are several Case Management services that are required to be offered.  These include Assessment, Development of IEP, Availability and Suitability of Training, Financial Aid Assistance, Pre‐Vocational Skills Workshops, Career Counseling, Employment Statistics Info, and Availability of Supportive Services.   Illinois requires that all Customers be co‐enrolled in the WIOA program to maximize the workers' access to all available services both programs can offer. 

  • Class Size Training

    ​Provides short-term skill upgrade training to help participants enter the workforce in good paying occupations. Class Size Training is intended only for WIOA eligible participants, and requires WIOA eligibility determinations, case management and reporting in IWDS. If the applicant is not a training provider, a public or private training provider for the project must be selected through a procurement process. For additional program requirements, refer to WIOA Policy Letter 15-WIOA-5.2.1.1, WIOA ePolicy.

  • Eligible Training Provider

    An Eligible Training Provider is an organization, such as a public or private technical school, college or university, or a community‐based organization whose application has been approved by the Local Workforce Investment Board (LWIB). These approved training providers are included on the State's Eligible Training Provider List (ETPL) and approved to receive training funds through an Individual Training Account (ITA).

  • HCTC

    ​The Health Coverage Tax Credit is a tax credit that pays 72.5 percent of qualified health insurance premiums for eligible individuals and their families. The HCTC program does not provide health insurance coverage.  The Trade affected worker will need to have or obtain qualified health insurance coverage. All plans that were qualified for the HCTC in 2013 qualify for the HCTC through 2019. This includes Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (COBRA) or spousal coverage if the employer, or former employer, did not pay 50 percent or more of the cost of coverage. Individual (private and non‐group) health insurance that you purchase for yourself or your family from an insurance company, agent, or broker is also included.

  • Health Coverage Tax Credit

    ​The Health Coverage Tax Credit is a tax credit that pays 72.5 percent of qualified health insurance premiums for eligible individuals and their families. The HCTC program does not provide health insurance coverage.  The Trade affected worker will need to have or obtain qualified health insurance coverage. All plans that were qualified for the HCTC in 2013 qualify for the HCTC through 2019. This includes Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (COBRA) or spousal coverage if the employer, or former employer, did not pay 50 percent or more of the cost of coverage. Individual (private and non‐group) health insurance that you purchase for yourself or your family from an insurance company, agent, or broker is also included.

  • Incumbent Worker Training

    Defined in WIOA as an individual who has an established employment history with the employer for 6 months or more.  Incumbent Worker training can be used to meet the needs of an employer or group of employers to help avert potential layoffs of employees or obtain the skills necessary to retain employment, such as increasing the skill levels of employees so they can be promoted within the company and create backfill opportunities for new or less‐skilled employees.   Employers that receive these funds must match the cost of the training on the following sliding scale:

    • 10 percent for employers with less than 50 employees;
    • 25 percent for employers with 50‐99 employees;  
    • 50 percent for employers with more than 100 employees.
  • Intermediaries

    ​Hold responsibility for the administration of the program. They can also provide expertise such as curriculum development, classroom instruction and supportive services, as appropriate. Intermediaries include:

    • Educational institutions including two-year and four-year postsecondary institutions, technical schools, or eligible providers of adult education and literacy activities under Title II. In this model the educational institution administers the program, works with employers to hire participants and provides classroom or on-line instruction for the program;
    • Industry associations administer the program and work with employer/members and educational entities to implement the program; and,
    • Community based organizations administer the program and work with employers, educational entities and the community to implement the program.
    • Local Workforce Areas or qualified services providers that administer the program and are qualified to determine participant eligibility.
  • IWT

    Defined in WIOA as an individual who has an established employment history with the employer for 6 months or more.  Incumbent Worker training can be used to meet the needs of an employer or group of employers to help avert potential layoffs of employees or obtain the skills necessary to retain employment, such as increasing the skill levels of employees so they can be promoted within the company and create backfill opportunities for new or less‐skilled employees.   Employers that receive these funds must match the cost of the training on the following sliding scale:

    • 10 percent for employers with less than 50 employees;
    • 25 percent for employers with 50‐99 employees;  
    • 50 percent for employers with more than 100 employees.
  • Non-Registered Apprenticeship

    ​An apprenticeship that is not registered with the U.S. Department of Labor, but meets all RA criteria other than application for registration. Note that the training program must be included on the Eligible Training Provider List.

  • OJT

    ​Provides skill upgrades to individuals hired as trainees with the expectation the trainee will be able to perform the tasks necessary for the position upon the completion of the training. OJT's are limited to six months of work time and are for new hires in full-time positions only. It is the employer's responsibility to provide training. The grant will pay for wage reimbursements to the employer based on payroll records on a sliding scale, from 50 percent to 75 percent of wages (not fringe benefits or overtime hours) based on the number of employees at the worksite. OJT's require WIOA eligibility determinations, case management and reporting in IWDS.

  • On-the-Job Training

    ​Provides skill upgrades to individuals hired as trainees with the expectation the trainee will be able to perform the tasks necessary for the position upon the completion of the training. OJT's are limited to six months of work time and are for new hires in full-time positions only. It is the employer's responsibility to provide training. The grant will pay for wage reimbursements to the employer based on payroll records on a sliding scale, from 50 percent to 75 percent of wages (not fringe benefits or overtime hours) based on the number of employees at the worksite. OJT's require WIOA eligibility determinations, case management and reporting in IWDS.

  • Out‐of‐Area Job Search Assistance

    ​Out‐of‐Area Job Search Assistance may cover expenses for a pre‐ approved job interview or other job search activities that occurs outside the worker's normal commuting area if suitable employment, as defined by State law, is not available in the area. The commuting area in Illinois is 10 miles. This service is available to affected workers certified under TAA 2002, Trade and Globalization Adjustment Assistance Act (TGAAA) 2009, and TAA Reauthorization Act (TAARA) 2015.

  • Out‐of‐Area Relocation Assistance

    ​Out‐of‐Area Relocation Assistance may cover expenses for a pre‐ approved move of the worker, his/her family and their household goods, outside the worker's normal commuting area if suitable employment as defined by State law is not available in the area. The commuting area in Illinois is 10 miles. The workers must have a bona fide offer of work.  This service is available to affected workers certified under TAA 2002, TGAAA 2009, and TAARA 2015.

  • Participant

    ​Defined in WIOA as a reportable individual who has received staff‐assisted services after satisfying all applicable programmatic requirements for the provision of services, such as eligibility determination. The following individuals are not participants: (i) Individuals who have not completed at least 12 contact hours in the Adult Education and Family Literacy Act (AEFLA) program; (ii) Individuals who only use the self‐service system; (iii) Individuals who only receive information services or activities; and (iv) Individuals receiving incumbent worker training through an eligible employer.

  • Pre-Apprenticeship

    ​A program that has a documented partnership with and is designed to prepare individuals to enter and succeed in a Registered Apprenticeship or Non-Registered Apprenticeship which includes all of the following:  

    • Training and curriculum that aligns with the skill needs of employers in the economy of the State or region and has been designed to prepare participants to meet the minimum entry level requirements of the Apprenticeship.

    • Access to educational and career counseling, and other supportive services as needed by participants.

    • Hands-on meaningful learning activities that are connected to education and training activities, such as Career Exploration and Career Development Experiences, and that reinforce foundational professional skills such as those outlined in the Essential Employability Skills framework.

    • Upon successful completion of the program, participants are encouraged to apply for a Registered Apprenticeship or Non-Registered Apprenticeship program, and may receive preference for enrollment.

  • RA

    ​A "Registered Apprenticeship" (RA) is an effective "earn and learn" model with a long history of providing career ladders and pathways to the middle class, particularly for the building and construction industry but increasingly in other industries as well. Registered Apprenticeships must be registered with the U.S. Department of Labor, and have five components: business involvement, structured on-the-job training, related classroom and workplace instruction, rewards for skills gains, and an industry recognized credential at the successful completion of training.

  • Registered Apprenticeship

    ​A "Registered Apprenticeship" (RA) is an effective "earn and learn" model with a long history of providing career ladders and pathways to the middle class, particularly for the building and construction industry but increasingly in other industries as well. Registered Apprenticeships must be registered with the U.S. Department of Labor, and have five components: business involvement, structured on-the-job training, related classroom and workplace instruction, rewards for skills gains, and an industry recognized credential at the successful completion of training.

  • Sector Partnership

    Partnerships of companies, from the same industry and in a shared labor market region, with education, workforce development, economic development, community organizations and other stakeholders that collectively focus on a set of priorities that matter to the competitiveness of their industry.  These partnerships are:  

    • Industry‐led, driven by a committed group of employer champions;  
    • Community‐supported by a diverse range of public program partners;  
    • Convened or facilitated by a credible third‐party (or intermediary);  
    • An organizing vehicle for multiple program partners to respond to industry priorities together;  
    • Local or regional (not top‐down or statewide);  
    • Action‐oriented, focused on improving industry sector competitiveness, and not limited to just workforce issues.
  • Sponsor

    ​Every Registered Apprenticeship program has a “sponsor.” The sponsor is responsible for the overall operation and administration of the program, working in collaboration with the partners. Sponsors can be a single business or a consortium of businesses. Alternatively, the sponsor can be a range of workforce intermediaries including an industry association, community-based organizations, chambers of commerce, local workforce areas, a joint labor management organization, community colleges, etc.

  • Trade Adjustment Assistance Program

    ​Helps trade‐affected workers who have lost their jobs because of increased imports or shifts in production out of the United States. Under the Trade Act of 1974, as amended, workers who experience a partial or total separation from employment due to increased imports may apply for Trade, which offers a variety of benefits and reemployment services to help unemployed workers prepare for and obtain suitable employment.

  • Training Services

    Defined in section 134(b)(3) of WIOA, as a service provided through an Individual Training Account (ITA) or through a training contract, that may be provided to eligible individuals if it is determined, after an interview, evaluation or assessment, and career planning, that the individual:  

    • is unlikely or unable to obtain or retain employment that leads to economic self‐sufficiency or wages comparable to or higher than wages from previous employment through career services alone;  
    • is in need of training services to obtain or retain employment that leads to economic self‐sufficiency or wages comparable to or higher than wages from previous employment, through career services alone; and  
    • has the skills and qualifications to successfully participate in the selected program of training services.
  • Waiver from the Training Requirement

    Under certain circumstances, an eligible worker may receive a waiver from the requirement for training, if they meet one of the three following conditions: health, enrollment unavailable or training not available.

  • WIOA

    ​An act to replace the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 to strengthen the United States workforce development system through innovation in, and alignment and improvement of, employment, training, and education programs in the United States, and to promote individual and national economic growth, and for other purposes.

  • Workforce Innovation & Opportunity Act

    ​An act to replace the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 to strengthen the United States workforce development system through innovation in, and alignment and improvement of, employment, training, and education programs in the United States, and to promote individual and national economic growth, and for other purposes.

  • Youth Apprenticeship

    A program for youth (ages 16 to 24) currently enrolled in secondary education or pursuing a high school equivalency, including those with disabilities, that include, at minimum, the following:

    • 450 hours of paid on-the-job training under the supervision of a mentor;
    • At least 2 semesters of related instruction that ideally counts towards a high school and/or postsecondary credential, but minimally leading to an Industry Credential;
    • Ongoing and a final assessment measuring success in mastering skill standards;
    • Career exploration where participants learn about several positions within the employer and the field; and
    • Wraparound supports (e.g. case management and counseling) and holistic upskilling (e.g. technical skills and soft skills).
    • Upon successful completion of the program, participants are supported to apply for one or more of the following: entry-level employment, admission to a Registered Apprenticeship or Non-Registered Apprenticeship program, or admission to other articulated postsecondary education options (including 2- and 4-year programs).