Apprenticeship IL Framework


Apprenticeship Illinois Framework

The Illinois Workforce Innovation Board's Apprenticeship Committee created the Apprenticeship Illinois Framework to address employers' and participants' varying degrees of knowledge and/or comfort with apprenticeships. The goal is to provide a variety of options for participation.

In addition to the well-known options of (1) Registered Apprenticeship(2) Pre-Apprenticeship, and (3) Youth Apprenticeship, the Apprenticeship Illinois Framework includes a fourth option: (4) Non-Registered Apprenticeship – Industry Recognized Credential Programs.

Similar to high-quality on-the-job training, this option requires all five characteristics associated with DOL Registered Apprenticeship be present:

  • Business involvement,
  • Structured on-the-job training,
  • Related instruction,
  • Rewards for skill gains, and
  • Industry recognized credential(s).

Click here to see key elements for each type of apprenticeship and click here to learn more about the State's common definitions in the Illinois Career Pathways Dictionary.


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Apprenticeship Navigator and Intermediary Framework

​Navigator
Intermediary​
Definition

Apprenticeship navigators serve as key points of contact in the region for outreach and partnership development to help expand apprenticeship programs. Navigators are also responsible for identifying intermediaries who can serve as supports (and at times sponsor) apprenticeship programs. 

Intermediaries bundle the needs of small and medium-sized businesses and ensure that the employer and all supporting parties' have clearly defined roles and responsibilities. Intermediaries can sponsor/manage apprenticeship programs, but are not required to do so.

​Service Area

Navigators are located in each of the economic development or local workforce area regions; they are primarily tasked with conducting recruitment and outreach activities to all employers regardless of the sector.

No geographic restriction; intermediaries are sector-specific, and may cover multiple sectors. 

​Role Specifications

Navigators should remain unbiased on the apprenticeship strategy, RTI and community support partners for each employer client. Navigators should connect employers to all available funding streams. 

​An intermediary can employ one or more navigators but the navigator should never execute intermediary functions. 

​Key Terms and Useful Descriptors

Marketing; making the field ripe; match making, & system building; they kick-start the program.

Make sure all of the activities and strategies are happening, but may not be doing “it” (e.g. sponsor)

​Employer Engagement / Recruitment

Using the US Chambers of Commerce’s Talent Pipeline Management’s approach to workforce development along with other business engagement best practices, navigators’ primary function is to engage employers and sell the idea of apprenticeship as a strategy for addressing talent pipeline challenges. 

While they can also recruit employers as part of their normal business functions, intermediaries are not primarily responsible for recruiting employers.

Talent-Facing Engagement​

​Navigators recruit industry associations, business organizations, labor management partnerships and talent-serving institutions such as community and technical colleges,

non-profit and community-based organizations and workforce development boards to serve as intermediaries.


Along with their internal talent pools (e.g.: in a community college setting or K-12 school district), intermediaries source for potential talent from community-based organizations and from the general labor market; employers have final approval for hiring the talent. 

Identification of Partners for RTI, Wraparound Supports​

Navigators are primarily responsible for identifying organizations that support the training and retention of apprentices. They should have a database of local partners in  their region.

Intermediaries are responsible for coordinating all organizations that support the training and retention of apprentices; they can play a secondary role in the  identification and recruitment of partners.

​Recruitment and Training of OJL Mentors

Navigators should not perform these functions. When an intermediary is needed to coordinate and/or implement a program, the navigator should identify the appropriate party that can serve as an intermediary or sponsor.

The intermediary should, in close partnership with the employer, identify and train mentors within the company who can provide structured on-the-job learning to apprentices. 

​Administration of Apprenticeship Program

Navigators should not perform these functions. When an intermediary is needed to coordinate and/or implement a program, the navigator should identify the appropriate party that can serve as an intermediary or sponsor.

The intermediary is responsible for ensuring this function is handled.

Holding Standards of a Program​

Navigators should not perform these functions. When an intermediary is needed to coordinate and/or implement a program, the navigator should identify the appropriate party that can serve as an intermediary or sponsor.

The intermediary should execute this function.

Registration with DOL (When Employer is Interested)​

When an intermediary is not needed and employer is interested in pursuing registration, the navigator should connect the employer to the DOL. 

With the employer’s significant input, the intermediary can complete and submit registration documents to DOL.

Data Collection

The navigator is responsible for collecting system-level data on their region in partnership with fellow navigators throughout the state.

The intermediary shares occupation-specific standards throughout the statewide apprenticeship navigator/intermediary network; the intermediary collects program and apprentice-level data.

Embedding Diversity

Navigators are not accountable for enrollment of diverse populations into apprenticeship programs but should explain to their employer contacts the benefits of hiring apprentices from underrepresented groups (e.g.: increased tax credits, responsiveness to a wider range of consumers). Navigators should build relationships with employers and labor groups that operate in sectors that have long used apprenticeship, but may not have underrepresentation from women and people of color.  Each navigator is also responsible for creating a list of community-based organizations that serve diverse and marginalized populations. 

Intermediaries are responsible for ensuring diverse populations are enrolled in apprenticeship programs according to metrics that DCEO specifies.